Latest SSD now online

(JAN. 23) — The latest copy of Social Science Diliman (SSD), is now available online.  

Inside the July-December 2018 issue are five articles that tackle health issues in the Asia-Pacific region in the 20th and 21st centuries.  The issue also has two book reviews: Aitor Anduaga’s “Cyclones and earthquakes: The Jesuits, prediction, trade, and Spanish dominion in Cuba and the Philippines, 1850-1898,” and Vivek Neelakantan’s “Science, public health and nation-building in Soekarnoera Indonesia.”

The articles featured on this issue are “Devoted to caring for their beloved children: Therapeutic choices for childhood illnesses in a Tokyo suburb, 1938-1939” by Sayaka Mihara, “Malaria and Japan’s colonial frontier: Manchuria, 1900s-1940s” by Jeong-Ran Kim, “Health, sovereignty and imperialism: The Royal Navy and infectious disease in Japan’s treaty ports” by Mark Harrison, “Evaluating the impact of the 1918-1920 influenza pandemic in Pre-War Imperial Japan” by Kenichi Ohmi and Akihito Suzuki and “It’s time to get Australian: Unpicking populist responses to immigration, asylum-seekers, leprosy and the nation” by Josephine Robertson.  

“Devoted to caring for their beloved children: Therapeutic choices for childhood illnesses in a Tokyo suburb, 1938-1939” provides empirical proofs that young children in 1930s Japan were thoroughly cared for, and as the author puts it, “during their illnesses with generous financial resources allocated for their health care.”

“Malaria and Japan’s colonial frontier: Manchuria, 1900s-1940s” is on the malaria problem among Chinese migrant laborers in Manchuria.  

Meanwhile, “Health, sovereignty and imperialism: The Royal Navy and infectious disease in Japan’s treaty ports” is a comparison of the response of the British Royal Navy with that of the Japanese’s response to cholera and venereal disease in treaty ports.

“Evaluating the impact of the 1918-1920 influenza pandemic in Pre-War Imperial Japan” is about the health impact of the Spanish influenza on Imperial Japan, Korea and Taiwan from 1918 to 1920.  

Lastly, “It’s time to get Australian: Unpicking populist responses to immigration, asylum-seekers, leprosy and the nation,” is about its author’s argument that the Federation of Australia “was predicated on producing a solution to the threat, not only of ‘others,’ but also of ‘disease-bearing others.”  

The SSD is an internationally-refereed semi-annual journal for the social sciences of the UP Diliman Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Development (OVCRD).  For more details on SSD and its printed copy, contact (02) 981-8500 local 4048 or (02) 436-8720. — Mariamme D. Jadloc 

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Posted: January 23, 2019 23:21