Academe

MLE celebrated at DLingg’s symposium

March 01, 2024
The UP Diliman (UPD) Department of Linguistics (DLingg) of the UPD College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP) recently held a symposium commemorating this year’s International Mother Language Day (IMLD), where multilingual education (MLE) was the focus. Co-organized by the Embassy of Bangladesh in Manila, the symposium was titled Multilingual Education: An Essential Strategy for Transforming Education Symposium. CSSP College Secretary Jem R. Javier, who hosted the event said, “The IMLD was proclaimed by the General Conference of UNESCO in November 1999. The idea to celebrate IMLD was the initiative of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh. The United Nations (UN) General Assembly welcomed the proclamation of the day in its Resolution of 2002.” Javier added DLingg is “one with the UN and the People’s Republic of Bangladesh in recognizing that languages and multilingualism can advance inclusion and that no one is left behind in pushing for a sustainably developed future.” In her remarks, DLingg Chair Maria Kristina S. Gallego said, “Both institutions value and promote linguistic and cultural diversity.” She added, “It was indeed a great opportunity to work with the embassy in co-organizing this IMLD.” The many participants filling the UPD National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (NISMED) auditorium was noticed by CSSP Dean Ruth R. Lusterio-Rico as she welcomed the symposium guests, which included various dignitaries, university officials, faculty, staff, and students within and outside UPD. “It’s so nice to see a full hall today to celebrate the IMLD,” Lusterio-Rico said. She said the symposium marks “a day for all of us to learn and appreciate the importance of the first language we learn from our birth, our mother language. This activity aims to provide for us an opportunity to discuss the needs, challenges, and strategies for MLE and the different challenges we face today.” The symposium highlight was the keynote message of Dina Joanna S. Ocampo, PhD, former undersecretary for curriculum and instruction at the Department of Education and former dean and professor of the UPD College of Education. Ocampo. Photo by Jefferson Villacruz, UPDIO “It’s a day that many people all over the world have fought for to celebrate mother languages, and to think about mother languages as integral not only to our community but also to our educational lives,” Ocampo said. In her address, Multilingual Education: An Essential Strategy for Transforming Education Systems, Ocampo discussed the importance of MLE in education development. “Our educational systems usually have a combination of humanistic and pragmatic goals and objectives. We seek the development of happy children because we want them to become happy adults. And happy adults don’t really start wars and don’t…
Academe

MLE’s successes and lessons across countries

March 01, 2024
The strategies to implement a multilingual education (MLE) were central in the presentation of Dina Joanna S. Ocampo, PhD at the UP Diliman (UPD) Department of Linguistics symposium Multilingual Education: An Essential Strategy for Transforming Education, in celebration of International Mother Language Day 2024. A professor at the UPD College of Education whose expertise is literacy difficulties, Ocampo said language is essential in advocating for peace. Ocampo. Photo by Jefferson Villacruz, UPDIO In discussing Multilingual Education: An Essential Strategy for Transforming Education Systems, Ocampo remarked MLE in any model or form is a strategy in accomplishing restorative justice in education. “Every child gets a fair chance. You cannot separate MLE from bleak our societies, but through some quality and effective program implementation, we hope to shift the balance of privilege. Through a well-developed and implemented MLE, we give children a fighting chance to use the super powers of language learning to overcome poverty and ignorance,” she said. Ocampo said that MLE has four claims: to improve learning, help children to learn through the use of the home language in school, support inclusive and culturally appropriate education, and help students to learn target languages in school. She said to fully accept MLE one would need to quit mere lip service and start actual program development. “The slowing down of the MLE program implementation means only one thing. That there will be a child who speaks a language different from that which is used in school, who is not getting a fair chance at learning, and learning delays will compound over time,” she said. In discussing the strategies for implementing the MLE, Ocampo said the first thing that should be done is to have the children learn their mother tongue. “So first, we need to look at rapid community assessments and see what children are actually speaking. The initial data on what children are speaking in communities is very important,” she said. She also underscored the importance of developing inclusive policies. “Policies that work are always learner-centered,” Ocampo said. “In my book, when we say education is improving, it means children are learning, or learners are growing no matter what age they are. So they have to be learner-centered,” she added. Ocampo speaking before the symposium participants. Photo by Jefferson Villacruz, UPDIO. Ocampo said the policies should also be well disseminated. If these are not well disseminated, they tend to be half-baked policies. “When…
Students

OIL-D launches study abroad fair

March 01, 2024
Various study abroad opportunities were presented to UP Diliman (UPD) students, faculty, and staff as the Office for International Linkages Diliman (OIL-D) opened the 2024 UPD Study Abroad Fair. The fair, with the theme LAYAG: Humayo at Matuto sa Ibang Ibayo (Set Out and Learn Overseas), was launched on Feb. 27 at the UPD School of Statistics (STAT) lobby and lecture hall. Students check the various booths at the fair. Photo by Jerald DJ. Caranza, UPDIO Information booths from 17 participating institutions offered free study-abroad consultation services. Freebies, raffle prizes, and snacks were also available at some booths.   Information sessions from various institutional partners and testimonials from current and former exchange students were held every afternoon at the STAT lecture hall until March 1. Partner institutions were grouped into Europe and the Americas (Goethe-Institut Philippinen, Campus France, Austrian Embassy, Education USA, Philippine Italian Association, German Academic Exchange Service/DAAD, Embassy of Hungary, Worcester College , Spanish Embassy–Education Office, National Autonomous University of Mexico, and University of British Columbia-Vancouver Summer Program) and Asia and Oceania (Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia in Manila, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in the Philippines, Australia Awards, UP Korea Research Center, Hokkaido University, and Global Korea Scholarship Philippines Alumni Association). (From left) OIL-D Director Carlene Perpetua Pilar-Arceo, Austrian Embassy in Manila Attache Christina Seiwald, Lusung-Oyzon, and Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Jerwin F. Agpaoa. Photo by Jerald DJ. Caranza, UPDIO The UP Office of International Linkages was also at the fair, showcasing their programs such as the Continuous Operational and Outcomes-based Partnership for Excellence in Research and Academic Training Enhancement (COOPERATE) and the Mobility for Vigor and Excellence–University of the Philippines (MOVE-UP) program. Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Maria Vanessa Lusung-Oyzon spoke on behalf of UPD Chancellor Edgardo Carlo L. Vistan II.   A former exchange student herself, Lusung-Oyzon, quoting a former program exchange coordinator, said studying abroad “is a great opportunity to place your heart in another community and gain global understanding and perspective by deepening your appreciation for other cultures and customs. It is a life-changing experience that molds valuable life skills such as decision-making skills, problem solving skills and conflict resolution. More importantly the experience abroad will help you learn more about yourself as you leave your mark in another part of the world.”

Research

Learning new stories to live by

February 07, 2024
Arran Stibbe, PhD, said the Philippines should protect its language diversity and its many traditional and indigenous cultures. An ecolinguist and a professor in ecological linguistics at the University of Gloucestershire, UK, Stibbe said the country’s languages and cultures contain ecological wisdom. Stibbe. Photo from Stibbe’s Facebook account In the study Traditional Ecological Knowledge Versus Ecological Wisdom: Are They Dissimilar in Cultural Landscape Research? by Rosyi Damayanti T. Manningtyas and Katsunori Furuya, ecological wisdom is defined as “the best expertise of pure improvisation for and from ecological practice that enables a person or community to make not only ethical judgments, but also take circumspect action on ecological practices.” The study was published on the MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute) website, a scholarly, open-access publication, accessed on Jan. 24. Ecological wisdom is important in constructing positive new stories for people to live by, in place of the current stories that Stibbe described as “stories of industrial civilization that are putting the planet on a path towards disaster.” Stibbe’s presentation. Screenshot of the webinar He mentioned that in the industrial civilization, the texts in newspapers, magazines, advertising, and even in economic textbooks influence culture. “These texts have an influence on our culture,” Stibbe said. He further explained that the hidden messages in these texts “are implanted very deeply in our consciousness and influence how we think, how we talk, and how we act.” He then posed the questions “Are these stories encouraging us to act in ways that create an equal and sustainable society? Or, are they negative stories which are encouraging us to consume too much and create an unfair society?” Stibbe explained that to avoid the possibility of collapse, and avoid the grim projections for 2050 (i.e. world population to increase to 9.7 billion and tripled chemical pollution), the industrial, consumerist, economic growth-driven civilization must transform itself into a sustainable civilization. Stibbe’s presentation. Screenshot of the webinar Quoting Ben Okri, the Nigerian-born British poet and novelist, Stibbe said, “Why stories? Stories are the secret reservoir of values. Change the stories that individuals or nations live by and you change the individuals and nations themselves.” According to Stibbe, ecological wisdom is embedded in languages and traditional cultures. “In the Philippines, you have many traditional cultures and indigenous cultures, and within those cultures, there is a lot of…
Extension

UPD, Batanes gov’t, and BSC sign MOU

February 07, 2024
UP Diliman (UPD), the Provincial Government of Batanes (PGB), and the Batanes State College (BSC) inked a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on Jan. 30 at the BSC Amphitheater. This was another milestone in UPDs’ partnership with the island province since Batanes was chosen as a member of the International Network of Sustainable Tourism Observatories (INSTO) of the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) on 16 June 2023 (See https://upd.edu.ph/upds-batanes-tourism-and-hospitality-monitoring-center for related story).   (From left) Tumanan, Resurreccion, Villa, Vistan, Durante, and Dela Santa. Photo from the Breathtaking Batanes Facebook page According to the MOU, the three parties shall engage in “research collaboration, extension projects, and similar undertakings related to the sustainability of the Batanes Islands and its membership in UNWTO-INSTO,” and shall cover the areas of “governance, resident satisfaction, destination economic benefits, employment and human resources, tourism seasonality and visitor satisfaction, energy management, solid waste management, wastewater management, climate change, accessibility, diversity, equity, and inclusivity.” The MOU, which will be effective until 30 Oct. 2026, details the obligations and responsibilities of the parties (UPD, PGB, and BSC) and concerns on intellectual property right and publications, as well as on confidentiality. UPD Chancellor Edgardo Carlo L. Vistan II remarked that this partnership with the Batanes local government and the BSC is an avenue for the University to offer its expertise and practice its public service in one of the country’s farthest regions. Vistan. Photo from the Breathtaking Batanes Facebook page Signatories of the MOU were Vistan for UPD, Batanes Provincial Governor Marilou H. Cayco (represented by Batanes Vice Governor Ignacio C. Villa) for PGB, and BSC President Djovi Regala Durante for the BSC. University officials that witnessed the MOU signing were Augustus C. Resurreccion, PhD, UP vice president for administration; Mary Anne Ramos Tumanan, PhD, project director of the Batanes Tourism and Hospitality Monitoring Center; and Edieser DL. Dela Santa, PhD, former dean of the UPD Asian Institute of Tourism. MOU signatories and witnesses. Photo from the Breathtaking Batanes Facebook page

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